Research to improve pest risk methods

The International Pest Risk Research Group is focused on improving pest risk modelling and mapping methods through the application and sharing of rigorous, innovative research.
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Helicoverpa armigera invading the Americas

Helicoverpa armigera larva in maize (Photo Tek Tay, CSIRO)

Helicoverpa armigera larva in maize (Photo Tek Tay, CSIRO)

Helicoverpa armigera has recently been discovered in South America.  It has since been tracked spreading into the Caribbean.  Pest risk modelling has revealed that most of the US crop production may be at some degree of risk from this pest, which has developed resistance to most pesticides.  The rapid northward spread in the Americas suggests that it is now a matter of when, rather than if it will invade the USA.  The pest risk research has been published in PLOS One.

The potential distribution of Helicoverpa armigera

The current and potential distribution of Helicoverpa armigera

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Panama disease in Queensland bananas

  Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Tropical Race 4 has been detected in Queensland, Australia.  In a blow to lovers of Cavendish bananas, this devastating vascular soil borne disease of bananas has been discovered in Tully, North Queensland, Australia.  This news is particularly difficult for Queenslanders to accept, as they are affectionately known within Australia […]

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Myrtle Rust in Tasmania

Myrtle Rust, caused by Puccinia psidii s.l. has been detected in Tasmania, Australia.  Also known as Guava or Eucalypt rust, this pathogen has an extremely wide host range, focused on the Myrtaceae.  There have been a number of pest risk analyses prepared and published by our members.  One of these indicated that parts of Tasmania […]

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